Monday, 22 May 2017

Having a Laugh!

Image result for having a laugh + images

Kezia Dugdale pledged the other day that Labour will end the gender pay gap in Scotland without appreciating the irony that over the past 12 years, the big Labour-run councils have been the worst offenders.  

A quick visit to North Lanarkshire Council, South Lanarkshire Council or Glasgow City Council would have put Kez right.

Alternatively, Kezia could have saved a lot of time and effort by simply reading my blog about the fight for equal pay in Scotland which has been raging since 2005.

Read the full story via the link below to The Scotsman.

  


http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/general-election/labour-pledges-to-end-the-gender-pay-gap-in-scotland-1-4451421

Labour pledges to end the gender pay gap in Scotland




Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale visits the Glasgow Science Centre. The MSP has pledged to close the gender pay gap in Scotland. Picture: John Devlin/TSPL

BY CHRIS MCCALL - The Scotsman

Women in Scotland face earning £60,000 less in their lifetime than men because of the gender pay gap, the latest research on the long-running issue has found.
Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale described the gap as “shameful” and vowed her party had plans to close it. 
Labour’s analysis of figures from the Office for National Statistics found in every age group, women earn less than men on average in Scotland, which builds up to a median of £60,000 less over a woman’s working life.
The SNP responded by claiming it had done more in government that any other party to promote gender equality in the workplace, adding that female employment in Scotland was among the highest in Europe. 
Plans to close the gender pay gap in the Labour manifesto include introducing a £10 real living wage, forcing businesses to publish pay ratios and creating a civil enforcement system to ensure compliance with gender pay auditing. 
Ms Dugdale said: “It is shameful that under the SNP and the Tories women in Scotland could earn £60,000 less than men on average well into their careers. “Closing the gender pay gap isn’t just a question of fairness - it is essential for our economy.